Posts

Bring the scientists, the policy makers, and the diplomats together

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Published! is a series of chats between GWIS member Lauren Poppi ( @laurenpoppi ) and women-identifying scientists who have recently published their work as first or corresponding authors. If you, a colleague, or someone you know has recently published, you can get in touch via Twitter ( @laurenpoppi ) or email <lauren.poppi@rutgers.edu>. Dr. Lyndsey Gray is a recent Ph.D. graduate at Colorado State University who has spent the last few years studying mosquito-transmitted malaria in West Africa. Lyndsey is a Sustainability Leadership Fellow, a P.E.O. Scholar, and the former President of the Northern Colorado GWIS Chapter. Lyndsey's master’s training in public health majoring in infectious disease epidemiology, together with her time in the Peace Corps, sparked a dual interest in science and policy. Along with several co-authors, Lyndsey penned a commentary in Science Magazine titled, “Integrate US science and diplomacy”. You can read the article here .  I caught up with Lyn

Gene editing our way to a precision medicine future: novel KRAS models of pancreatic cancer

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  Published! is a series of chats with women in science highlighting their publications as leading authors. If you know someone who has recently published a scientific manuscript who would like to chat with me, you can get in touch via Twitter  @laurenpoppi  or email < lauren.poppi@rutgers.edu >. Dr Maria De La Paz Zafra Martin is a cancer biology postdoctoral fellow at Weill Cornell University in New York, who recently published an article in Cancer Discovery. Maria has spent the last few years developing new models of pancreatic cancer using cutting-edge gene editing technology. The models are based on mutations in a gene called ‘ KRAS ’ from human cancer patients. Maria tells us a bit about gene editing and its limitations, precision medicine, why it is important to stay adaptive as a scientist, and the importance of finding a happy and collaborative lab environment. You can read Maria and the Dow lab’s article in Cancer Discovery here . Congratulations on your publication, M

A galactic story of friendship that ends with an explosion: superluminescent supernova gc2017

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  Published! is a series of chats with women in science highlighting their publications as leading authors. If you know someone who has recently published a scientific manuscript who would like to chat with me, you can get in touch via Twitter  @laurenpoppi  or email < lauren.poppi@rutgers.edu >. Dr. Héloïse Stevance is an astrophysics postdoctoral fellow at the University of Auckland, New Zealand. Héloïse recently published a  paper  that uses a computer mini-universe to work out the likely events that lead to the real observations of superluminescent supernova 2017gci. In addition to being a full-time astrophysicist, Héloïse is also a well-known science communicator and a roller derby player. We chat about everything from hydrogen wiggles, magnetars, and black holes, to writing papers in LaTeX, fluorescent hair vs. clickbait, and power dynamics in academia. Héloïse provides a refreshing glimpse into research life in New Zealand, and emphasizes that in addition to working consi